A Series: Film Photography and the ‘Gram

Instagram is a funny old place. Travellers, fitness bloggers and Kardashians all share one big planet in which they can indulge in each others worlds for just a second before flinging them away with the twitch of a finger.

For photographers, Instagram is a godsend. Not only is it a great platform to promote your work, but it offers literally endless inspiration to go and shoot pretty much anything. That is, if you don’t get stuck in a 3 hour meme hole or scrolling through your old boss’ holiday pics from 2012…

Film photography and Instagram seem completely contradictory when you look at them from a scietal perspective. Insta seems to awaken our most narcissistic, sadistic selves that are constantly and simultaneously looking to be both the centre of attention, and hidden away in an anxious mess, it moves fast and it waits for no one.

Whereas shooting film is a satisfyingly slow process that many find deeply cathartic. Once you’e developed your negatives, you’re the only person in the world to have seen that image. It isn’t floating in a sea of shared images and muted emotions. It’s your tangible piece of memory, something unique and untouched my the unstoppable monolith of the internet.

The crossing of these two worlds is something that marks a change in our digital-first mindsets. Young photographers are switching up their DSLRS for 35mm film cameras from the 70s and 80s. These young people have come of age in an world where social media has been there for every day of their adult life. They want something real, something imperfect to offset the photoshopped bikini pictures and the sponsored product placement. This is a new generation of film shooters.

In a series of ongoing DM conversations with our film community on instagram, I’ll aim to paint a picture of the online film community of today and see if we’re coming to the end of an era, or the start of something beautiful.

 

Keep up to date with the blog to read interviews with some of my favourite Insta photographers and if you’d like to recommend an account, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

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